Scott’s Blog

’12 Burgs – they rock, if you can find ‘em…

Monday, April 14th, 2014

We’ve had several days of warm sunshine here in the valley, and the vines are waking up indeed. Looks like we’re on track for a “normal” window for bud-break here in mid-to-late April. More as it happens…

Meanwhile in Burgundy they are 3-4 weeks ahead of schedule, and are working like mad in the vineyards to keep up with the early season growth. With things kicking off so early, there is still a risk of a spring frost. Please, don’t let that happen. That’s truly the only disaster that hasn’t hit Burgundy in the last 4 years – let’s keep it that way!

Vineyard work under way at Huber-Verdereau's Clos du Colombier in Pommard

The big news today is the release of the new issue of Burghound, the definitive coverage of Burgundy wines from critic Allen Meadows. This issue covers the 2012 reds from the Côte de Beaune producers. We’re excited to see excellent scores for our guys – Thierry Violot-Guillemard in Pommard (big scores for all of the 1er Crus), Anne-Françoise Gros in Beaune (Richebourg, Echezeaux, Vosne-Romanée all strong), and Thiébault Huber in Volnay (Clos du Colombier and Volnay Fremiets, especially).

The only issue with the 2012s is going to be availability. Some producers lost as much as 85% of their crop to the hailstorms that wreaked havoc over the 2012 season. Fortunately, most of the damage was done early in the season, so the fruit that remained was healthy and made some truly excellent wines. (It is, however, a significantly variable vintage – the good wines are really good, the others, not so much…)

Due to the miniscule production levels, we obviously won’t be able to get our normal allocation of these wines – in fact far from it. Because the supply is so limited, we’ve decided to sell most of the ’12 Burgundies on a pre-arrival basis. Watch your emails in the coming weeks, as we’ll be offering the best ‘12s from our top producers on a pre-arrival basis only. These wines will sell-out quickly, so please don’t hesitate if you see something you really want. Details soon…

Bursting forth…

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

I love the vineyards at this time of year – full of expectation, full of promise, energy gathering in the core of the vines and getting ready to burst forth…

New buds getting ready to burst forth, lower block of Azana Vyd. 4-7-14

I’m happy to report that all is looking well here, with bud-break maybe a couple of weeks away. In more great news – in both Burgundy and Champagne, they’ve had a warm and early spring, and there is already a lot of growth, with fresh green leaves on the vines. Would it be too much to ask for all of us to have a nice, easy year? Just this once? I promise I won’t ask for it again until at least next year…

I’m getting very fired up for our Champagne Club tasting event Saturday in Carlton. I’ll be pouring four outstanding Grower Champagnes, including the micro-production 2005 from Francis Cossy, and the amazing 2008 Special Club from Forget-Chemin. And a couple of your favorites from Marc Chauvet and Pierre Brigandat are back in stock as well – this is totally going to rock! See you here Saturday from 12-5…

The Rites of Spring…

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014

Spring has indeed sprung here in Oregon. Of course that means we still have plenty of cold and rainy weather to come! After all these years I now believe what I was told when we first moved here – “Summer doesn’t start in Oregon until the 4th of July!”

The vineyards have all been pruned, and are waiting for the earth to warm up enough to wake up the life force that’s been dormant in the plants since November. Some vignerons prune as early as January. We tend to prune later. I admit to being influenced by the old Burgundian saying “Taille tôt, taille tard, rien ne vaut le taille de Mars” – which means “Prune early, or prune late, but nothing’s better that pruning in March.” It’s worked for them for a few hundred years, so I’ll take it on faith!

Pruned and ready to rock at Ribbon Ridge

Speaking faith, please join me in praying to whatever gods you believe in for something resembling a “normal” year in Burgundy this year. After four successive years of hail-ravaged growing seasons and miniscule crops (down 70-100% in many spots in 2013), a lot of the growers there simply cannot survive another one. Many may not ultimately survive the hardships of these last four years as it is. Some estates will be passing out of family control after many generations. It’s a very sad state of affairs indeed.

Lots of great stuff ahead for us here – including some surprises we can start to reveal over the summer…  For now, a quick heads-up to our Club members on two upcoming events – our Champagne Club party is set for April 12th in Carlton, and the Burgundy Club event follows two weeks later on April 26th. Save the dates and plan to join us!

Occupational Hazards…

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

We had the honor of being part of a great dinner last night in Portland, a fundraiser for the Classic Wines Auction. The auction has raised over $30 million for local child and family charities, and they put on a winemaker dinner series leading up to the big event every year.

This year we were paired with star chef Naomi Pommeroy and her restaurant “Beast” in NE Portland. Naomi has starred on Top Chef, and is on the shortlist for the James Beard Awards this year for Best Chef Northwest. She rocked our world with a hedonistically scrumptious four-course extravaganza. My faves were the Lacquered Duck Confit (which we paired with the amazing A-F Gros 2011 Chambolle-Musigny) and the Lamb loin chop with Parsnip purée and seared greens (with our 2011 Audrey Pinot.) Whoa!

I’m looking forward to our special tasting event Saturday in Carlton – with some great wines from Volnay and Pommard. Two legendary Burgundian villages that sit right next to each other, yet produce wines that can be as different as night and day. Come taste for yourself – this’ll be a great learning opportunity as we explore the unique terroir of these two great appellations in the Côte de Beaune…

Looking ahead, make plans to join us for a preview of our 2012 Pinots here in Carlton on Saturday March 8th from 12-5p. It’s a free tasting for members of our Scott Paul Club – and if you’re not signed up yet you still have time to join. Just email Kelly Karr and she’ll hook you right up. Membership guarantees you an allocation of our limited production Pinots, and gets you 15% off your Scott Paul Pinot purchases all year long. 2012 will probably go down as one of the best Oregon vintages ever – so come taste and see what it’s all about!

Emerging from Oregon’s ice age…

Monday, February 10th, 2014

It’s been a bizarre last few days here in Portland and in wine country. On Thursday afternoon we got hit with the first of two major winter storms that dumped up to a foot of snow on us, followed by an ice storm over the weekend that pretty much crippled everything. We all bailed out of the winery on Thursday after lunch, and after 2-4 hours of crawling through traffic and sliding around everyone made it home safely. And then nobody moved. As I write this on Monday afternoon, it has warmed up and everything is melting, so we should be back in business by tomorrow. Just about everything has been closed – schools, businesses, roads. Thankfully the Olympics have been on. I never knew I could get so excited about Biathalon and Curling…

We're not in California anymore...

I was really looking forward to the tribute to the Beatles on the 50th anniversary of their Ed Sullivan show appearance in 1964, a special which aired last night on CBS. It had its great moments – Stevie Wonder, Joe Walsh, and of course McCartney himself, better at age 72 than all of today’s hitmakers combined. Watching Ringo perform has always been cringe-inducing for me, and he was exceptionally smarmy on this one. Even worse offenders were Maroon 5 and Katy Perry, who should have been embarrassed to attempt those songs in front of Paul. He must’ve been wanting to crawl under his seat…

Looking ahead to this weekend – Valentine’s Day, baby! Bring your sweetie to Carlton on Saturday for a rockin’ good flight of four Grower Champagnes from some of our favorite producers, including Laherte Frères, Vincent Couche, Francis Cossy and Forget-Chemin! Very seductive, indeed…

As I’ve mentioned briefly before, we’re working on a special collaboration with Burgundy superstar Jean-Nicolas Meo of Domaine Meo-Camuzet in Vosne-Romanée – and he’s coming to town this weekend to check in on the 2013 wines in barrel and to work on expanding his project for the 2014 vintage. Kelley Fox is just back from visiting in Burgundy (she missed the snow and ice here – lucky girl!), and we’ll all be sharing a good bottle or three with J-N, if I were a betting man…

Jean-Nicolas Meo, in deep contemplation over a bottle of Jayer Cros-Parantoux...

You can’t keep good terroir down…

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Burgundy has been beaten up pretty badly these past few years. Four years in a row (2010, 2011, 2012 & 2013) of very small crops, hail storms that saw some producers lose 80% or more of their crops, rain, rot, mildew – you name it, it’s been flung in Burgundy’s face again and again. And yet they soldier on.

Not only do they soldier on, somehow in the face of all the adversity they manage to continue to produce some astonishing wines. It seems that the magic and the power of Terroir is simply determined to triumph over all. Case in point – the death-defying 2012s.

I’ll let the experts call it as they see it. First, the Burghound himself, Allen Meadows

“2012 saw just about every possible growing season misfortune possible with the exception of botrytis. There was frost, cool weather at the wrong time, hail (mostly in the Côte de Beaune), constant rain, a poor flowering, severe attacks of both mildew and powdery mildew, an intense heat wave that sunburned exposed fruit and a heavy storm during the harvest. It’s honestly hard to pack in more problems in just one growing season. Not surprisingly, all of these problems contributed greatly to a vintage that would produce the smallest yields since 2003.

Yet despite all of the problems, the quality of the raw materials, and the resulting wines, are not only good but in many cases excellent. The 2012s are concentrated wines with ripe and moderately firm supporting tannins, good freshness and enough acidity to maintain the proper balance. 2012 produced many really lovely wines that should provide for delicious drinking early on yet be capable of amply rewarding mid-term cellaring and in a few cases, they will be as long-lived if perhaps not quite as long-lived as the 2010s. Moreover there is fine transparency to the wines such that the underlying terroir is very much on display. The high levels of dry extract and relatively fine grain of the tannins combine to create seductively suave textures that avoid any sense of heaviness as there is good freshness and sufficient acid verve to maintain the finishing balance.

In sum, 2012 is a very fine vintage built for mid-term aging. The key challenges for us as consumers will be twofold: the first is simply to find them and the second will be paying for them as they will not, indeed cannot, be inexpensive. The average 2012 is very good, and the best of them are excellent.”

The take from International Wine Cellar’s Steve Tanzer is on the same track –

“Great natural concentration and small, thick-skinned grapes due to a poor flowering enabled Burgundy’s better producers to make monumental wines in 2012. The vintage yielded soil-inflected wines with a rare combination of aromatic complexity, density of texture, fresh acidity and lush, velvety tannins, but growers had to overcome a host of climatic challenges, including violent hail storms on the Cote de Beaune, to succeed.

Of course, what doesn’t kill us makes us stronger:  the tiny crop was also the key to the high quality and richness of the 2012s, imbuing the wines with outstanding natural concentration–i.e., a concentration that did not throw off the balance of the wines.  The 2012s show a density of texture, usually without heaviness, that is extremely rare for Burgundy.  Had it not been for the poor flowering, the weather conditions of 2012 would probably not have been sufficient to ripen fuller crop loads. Smart, conscientious growers and winemakers were in the position to make some of the richest and most satisfying wines of their careers.”

These thoughts and comments echo my own, which I first wrote about here last November, while in Burgundy tasting some 400 examples of the 2012s. I love the ‘12s for their generosity of fruit, their distinct sense of terroir in most cases, and their immediate approachability. They remind me a lot of the lovely 1985s – which have had a 25+ year run of non-stop deliciousness. To be sure, the ‘12s are not as “serious” or “classic” as the 2005s, but then few other vintages ever are or will be. Tanzer is saying he thinks these may best the 2010s –

“I suspect that over the next decade the 2012s will give more pleasure than the 2010s, and many Burgundy lovers will prefer them.”

At any rate, keep your eyes open for forthcoming offers of the 2012s over the course of the year. The wines will be extremely limited due to the low yields, and there will not be many bargains among them. Keep some powder dry!

On the Oregon side, Kelley Fox and I just finished a comprehensive tasting of our 2013s in barrel and our 2012s in bottle. I’m really happy with the development of the ‘13s so far. Maybe the Burgundian wine gods were smiling on us, as it seems we will make some excellent wines from one of the most difficult vintages nature has thrown at us. All of the lots are not thru malo yet, so I’ll wait to post detailed tasting notes until after malo is finished and we can really judge.

As to the ballyhooed 2012 vintage in Oregon, it’s everything it’s cracked up to be and then some. We won’t be releasing any until late this spring (though our Scott Paul Club will get first crack at ‘em in March) – but these are flat-out gorgeous wines that are candidates for the best we’ve ever put in the bottle. Once again we’ve shared a lot of similarities with our Burgundian brethren in terms of the character of the wines. The Oregon ‘12s have superb concentration (from low yields), ideal balance, and stunning aromatics. I am sitting here with a glass of the ’12 Audrey in front of me, and I am a very, very happy man…

Our way-yummy 2012s - coming soon to a glass near you...

Just when you thought it was safe…

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Happy 2014 to you! We’re back from New Orleans. A few pounds heavier, but happier nonetheless. It was a great holiday break, with Martha and Pirrie and I enjoying a seemingly endless parade of great food, family, and fun for 10 days. Now eight years post- Katrina, the Crescent City is more vibrant and alive than ever, and America’s favorite food city (according to the new issue of Food & Wine) is more delicious than ever.

We bravely ate our way through old stand-bys like Camelia Grill and Mahoney’s and the Roosevelt Hotel, and dove into some of the best of the newer spots including District (twice), Borgne, Marti’s, Ivy, Mariza, Manning’s, Company Burger, Pêche, and Sucré (twice!) Needless to say I am back on the running trails in Forest Park with a vengeance. My next marathon is not until June, so I’ve got some time to undo the damage. (Speaking of great burgers – just tried the new Tilt in the Pearl District – absolutely loved it!)

A killer burger at Tilt in PDX...

Lots of exciting stuff coming our way this year in the Scott Paul world – including the first addition to our staff in several years. Please join me in welcoming Ben Savery to the team as our first-ever General Manager. Ben joined us on Jan. 1, and comes to us from a 10-year stint as Sales Manager at Provvista, the northwest’s top importer and distributor of specialty food products. He’ll be based in our Carlton office, and I’m sure you’ll be seeing him in the tasting room and at upcoming events.

Some of the best new wines from Burgundy just arrived a few weeks before the holidays. If you haven’t had the chance yet, check out the gorgeous offerings from the legendary Anne-Françoise Gros of Vosne-Romanée, Chateau de la Tour in the iconic Clos Vougeot, and the tiny but mighty Domaine Clos de la Chapelle in Volnay. These are stunning wines of which we only get a few cases of each – so re-stock your cellar now with some of the best of 2011…

In our cellar in Carlton right now the 2013s are just finishing malolactic fermentation, after which Kelley & I will do our next round of serious tastings to see what these wines are all about and what they want to be when they grow up. Watch this space for all the updates as things progress. It’s great to back – let’s make 2014 a rockin’ great year full of great Pinot for all!

And here’s a portrait of the vintner as a young boy (age 6), found while cleaning out the closets over the holidays…

Food, Wine & Rock and Roll in 2013…

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

As the year winds down, I always try to take some time to reflect on the past 12 months, take stock, and look forward to our next trip around the sun. The first thing that comes to mind is how blessed I am to be in this business, producing something I truly love and believe in. It has not been an easy ride – in fact this year in many ways has been more challenging than ever. That which doesn’t kill us makes us stronger, however, and stronger we will be indeed. 2014 will bring a lot of exciting changes to the world of Scott Paul Wines – watch this space for upcoming announcements and all the news…

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As for things outside of work that have been highlights of the year for me:

Favorite Concerts –

Pearl Jam, Eagles and Fleetwood Mac are putting on the best shows of their lives right now, and their Portland and Seattle gigs this year were simply outstanding. I have personal history with each of these groups, and perhaps I’m biased, but all young bands should be required to see these shows to understand and appreciate what great live performances are all about. I did not mention Bruce Springsteen only because I did not see Bruce this year. He is still, and always will be in my book, the best live performer on the planet.

As far as new music this year, not much really blew me away. The stuff that makes it through to the mainstream in this era seems pretty mediocre to me. Justin Timberlake is a major talent, and so is Bruno Mars, but it’s not what I want to listen to for personal pleasure. Albums I loved this year include the new one from Pearl Jam (“Sirens” is maybe Eddie’s best song ever), Kacey Musgraves, Natalie Maines, and Civil Wars. There’s a new Springsteen album coming in January, so there’s hope…

Favorite Films –

Blue Jasmine and Dallas Buyers Club are the two that rocked my world. Cate Blanchett, Matthew McConnaughey and Jared Leto should all win Oscars. And I love that Woody Allen is doing some of his best work at age 78. That gives me hope, with the big 6-0 looming for me next summer…

Thierry's 1966 Pommard Rugiens

Favorite Wines –

I am ridiculously lucky to be able to taste the array of older wines that I run across in my travels. This year there were a few that really stood out:

1966 Pommard Rugiens – Violot-Guillemard. Had this with Le Pigeon chef Gabe Rucker and Andy Fortgang and our families at Le Benaton in Beaune last summer. It inspired Gabe and Hanna to consider naming their unborn daughter Pommard (they changed their minds later to Madeleine, after their fave resto in Burgundy, Caves Madeleine.)

1961 Pommard Rugiens Huber-Verdereau. A gift from Thiébault Huber, and enjoyed at the Paulée in Beaune last month. Pure, still powerful and persistent, and dazzlingly complex. Amazing wine.

1941 Richebourg – DRC. It never ceases to blow my mind how good some of these wartime wines can be. In the middle of WWII, with just the women and children around to tend to the vines and make the wine – the results are often remarkable. Perhaps these are the greatest examples of the power of terroir – the greatness of the great vineyard sites simply would not allow themselves to be denied. Brought to the Paulée last month by the Burghound himself, Allen Meadows.

1915 Chambolle-Musigny les Charmes – Jadot. Certainly my favorite wine of the year. Direct from the cellars of Jadot – 98 years old and in pristine condition. I was captivated by it’s extreme elegance, freshness, and purity, its kaleidoscopically complex aromas, and the most refined silk on the palate. A wine that will live in my memory as long as I live.

My favorite Champagne of the year – the new release of Georges Laval Brut Nature. It’s what I’ll be drinking on New Year’s Eve. (I’d drink his 2008 Les Chênes for the holiday, but we sold it all before I grabbed a bottle for myself!) Vincent Laval makes micro-amounts of what are arguably the best wines in all of Champagne. Shhhh – don’t tell anyone…

The Wizard of Cumières - VIncent Laval

Favorite Meals –

I am spoiled rotten at home, as Martha is a fabulous cook. We are also spoiled rotten to have such breadth of great choices in Portland and Wine Country, not to mention a few choice spots in Burgundy as well. Tops for me this year:

Chez Guy – Gevrey-Chambertin. The truffle menu. Need I say any more?

Auprès du Clocher – Pommard. As many times as I go there, I’ll never tire of the amazing melted-Époisses and spice-bread dessert. OMG.

Caves Madeleine – Beaune. My go-to spot in Burgundy, and Le Pigeon chef Gabe Rucker’s favorite meal in France. Simple Bistro cuisine at it’s absolute best.

Le Pigeon – Portland. We had a number of memorable meals there again this year, but perhaps the two best weren’t in the restaurant. Gabe cooked an amazing meal for a bunch of us in Beaune one night last summer that was one of the best nights ever. Then last month he had a bunch of people over to his house in Portland and he cooked up an 8-course extravaganza that was completely over-the-top. Gabe has got to be one of the most talented chefs working in the US today – we’re all lucky to have him in our midst.

I hope you enjoyed a lot of good food and wine and music this year, and that the new year brings you nothing but the best. (And that Santa brings you a bottle of ’59 La Tâche! If he does, CALL ME!)

Wine-ing and dining with Gabe Rucker and friends in Beaune...

My warmest wishes for a wonderful holiday season!

It's beginning to look a lot like France…

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

I returned from France last week to a flurry of articles in the national and local press about the influx of French producers descending on the Willamette Valley. Apparently what David Lett knew in 1965 and the Drouhin family new in 1987 has now become common knowledge – we are blessed with one of the best places on the planet to grow Pinot Noir. We don’t have the limestone soils of Burgundy, but our land doesn’t cost $8,000,000 per acre, either. Portland wine writer Katherine Cole offers the best summary here…

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"Burgundy West" - Oregon's Dundee Hills

Having worked for the Drouhins (managing DDO 2001-2004), and now being an Oregon wine producer that is also an importer of Burgundy and Champagne, I feel like I’m right in the middle of this suddenly-exploding Oregon-Burgundy connection. It’s especially exciting to have Burgundy star Jean-Nicolas Meo (Domaine Meo-Camuzet in Vosne-Romanée) making wine in our winery this year. Jean-Nicolas is a protégé of the legendary Henri Jayer, and has teamed up with my old music business friend Jay Boberg to launch a new project in Oregon starting with the 2013 vintage. Winemaker Kelley Fox and I have had a great experience working with and learning from Jean-Nicolas. Heads-up: there will be a Scott Paul wine from 2013 that is a collaboration between us and Jean-Nicolas, to be released sometime in 2015. You might want to join the Scott Paul Club now just to make sure you get a shot at it. I’m just sayin’…

At the Paulée in Burgundy with Jean-Nicolas Meo

Thanksgiving seems to have come and gone in a blur and a flash. I can’t believe we’re already full-on into the Christmas season. We have a lot of great stuff in stock for all of your holiday entertaining, gift-giving, and of course your own personal cellar. Our 2011 Audrey Pinot Noir makes a great gift for your Pinot-loving friends. From France we’ve got super-rare Burgundies from Anne-Françoise Gros and J-J Confuron, an exciting new American in Burgundy at Domaine Clos de la Chapelle in Volnay, and some of the top-scoring White Burgundies of the year from Buisson-Charles in Meursault. Order Now!

And if you need bubbles – and don’t we all – the new reviews are out from The Wine Advocate, and we’ve got a bunch of the leading Grower Champagnes of the year, from Laherte Frères, Georges Laval, Vincent Couche and many more.

It’s been another exciting year, and I’m looking forward to celebrating the season in style, with family, friends, and a great food and wine in abundance. Cheers!

Random thoughts from 34,000 feet…

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

I don’t understand why, but WiFi is still not available on international flights. Maybe it’s nice to get a 10-hour break from email anyway… I’m writing at 34,000 feet somewhere over Greenland, happy to be headed home and a touch sad to be leaving what’s become my second home these last several years.

The kindness and generosity of the Burgundians and the Champenois continues to blow me away. The stereotype of the rude French could not be further from the truth in my experience. (OK, in Paris some people do seem to make a sport out of being less than warm. One could probably say the same for New York – so we’re even on that count.)

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In 1961, I was turning seven. Thiébault Huber’s grandfather Raoul was farming 5 acres of vines in Volnay and Pommard, and making his wines in crude barns next to his Volnay townhouse. The same barns and the house that had been occupied by German soldiers and officers just 17 years prior – while Raoul was a prisoner of war and his wife and children were forced to live in the stables in the next village over. The same house where Thiébault’s mother was born. The house I stay in when I’m in Burgundy. Thiébault now makes his wines in those old stone barns.

And when I asked him if there was something older in the cellar I could share with everyone at the Paulée, he went down in the cellar and came up with a bottle of his grandfather’s 1961 Pommard. The history, the people, the land, the stories, the wars – all of that was in the bottle, and more. The wine itself was pure nectar – silky and velvety and rich and voluptuous and sweet in a way that can only come from over 50 years in the bottle, and that could only come from Pommard. I’ve been lucky enough to taste a lot of great wines in my life. Famous, legendary, priceless bottles. None of them will ever mean as much to me as Raoul’s 1961. I am humbled by the beauty and mystery that is wine.

Two weeks in Champagne and Burgundy and over 240 wines later (yes, I counted), it’s been a good visit. Deepening relationships with old friends, meeting new folks, and communing with the terroir and traditions that make these the two most unique wine regions on the planet. That’s what keeps us all coming back – the alchemy and the fairie dust and the unknown that make these wines impossible to duplicate.

I do get angry sometimes. When I see the bags of toxic chemicals strewn at the end of vine rows that are owned and farmed by people who know better but do it anyway. When I walk past certain cellars and see the must concentrators or reverse-osmosis machines pumping away – in the cellars of people who make a lot of noise about the “purity of terroir” when talking about their wines. Well, at the end of the day, the truth is always in the glass, n’est’ce pas?

***

I’ve just seen the results of a lot of interesting research – information that helps clarify which are the myths and which are indeed the realities of some of Burgundy’s vineyard and winemaking history. Much of what we’ve been told about ancient traditions and practices seems to actually be inventions of the 20th century – the 1920s and 30s being a very fertile time for the creation of much of the folklore that has become the “Burgundy myth”. That said, a lot of what we’ve been told is indeed true. And pretty darn amazing. Clos de Bèze has truly been a vineyard of renown since the early 600s. The Cistercian monks really did plant and develop much of the vineyard land we know today (though they were apparently also growing a lot of vegetables in the same plots.) When all is said and done, a wine like Musigny could only come from the Musigny vineyard, Montrachet could only come from Montrachet, and that is ultimately what it’s all about.

I have no doubt we’ll be saying things like that about wines from specific places in Oregon one day, maybe New Zealand too, or perhaps places we don’t even know about yet. The true power of our magic remains, for now, unknown…